EU plans additional Libya stimulus package amidst verbal and legal challenges from politicians, experts and NGOs.

While the European Union (EU) is looking to further bolster Libya and the Libyan coastguard, a majority of Members of European Parliament (MEPs) and a number of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) Intergovernmental Organizations (IGOs) and experts criticize the EU’s involvement in the human rights abuses that are systematically taking place inside Libya. They state that Libya is not a safe place for the disembarkation of migrants and refugees and that by financially supporting Libyan institutions that facilitate widespread and systematic human rights abuses, the EU has been complicit in these crimes. This week steps were taken to address and review the EU’s policies and accountability inside Libya.

News highlights: NGOs call for change in EU-Libya relations amidst ECA complaint, Migrant returns to Ethiopia continue despite COVID-19, Greece to close Vathy migrant camp on island of Samos

This week’s news highlights: UK withdraws embassy staff from Eritrea; Rumours about the situation in Eritrea; Ethiopia destroying homes leaving hundreds of people homeless; Thousands of migrants returned to Ethiopia amidst COVID-19; Inadequate preparedness slows COVID-19 response in Somalia; Record of internally displaced persons in 2019; NGOs state that EU policies facilitate the abuse of migrants and refugees in Libya as organisations launch ECA complaint; EU to bolster Libya’s coastguard amidst MEP backlash; WFP says 104.793 people assisted in March amidst COVID-19; Migrants and refugees discriminated in Tunisia; Announcement closure Greek migrant camp; German experts advise on migrant working permit scheme; Asylum seeker in Germany wins court case; Bosnian minister proposes migrants and refugees should be deported; Proposal to map undocumented migrants south Italy; Less people granted Asylum in Europe 2019; Migrants and refugees first victims of COVID-19 containment; And refugees and migrants provide support in medical and agricultural sectors to curb labour shortages

Commercial Sex Workers in Kenyan slum face shortage of income

An interview* with three women living in a slum area in Pumwani, Majengo area, Nairobi county, Kenya revealed that Commercial Sex Workers (CSW) struggle to survive and gain income due to COVID-19 lockdown. Working primarily in the streets, from homes or from hotels the current situation left many with a serious shortage of income. With markets, bars and restaurants closed and a curfew between 7pm- 5am CSWs have lost clients. Many of them are young girls and single mothers who increasingly risk homelessness and fear for their ability to provide basic needs or next meal. The financial restrains mean that CSWs take increased risks to provide for themselves and family. More dangerous clients are accepted and many of CSWs move from a more protected environment out on the streets.