Horn Highlights: No signs yet of aid in Tigray, Food stocks in Tigray at all time low, Amnesty calls on Egypt to stop deporting Eritreans

In this week’s Horn Highlights: UNOCHA says food stocks in Tigray at all time low; Reports that no aid trucks have entered Tigray despite humanitarian ceasefire; BBC interview with women who report being raped in Amhara; National Dialogue dead on arrival, states Wight; Amhara regional president asks for Russian support to rebuild; UAE continues to send aid to Tigray; calls to protect Ethiopian patriarch; Eritrean troops remain in Tigray despite year-old announcement of withdrawal; Amnesty International calls on Egypt to stop deportations of Eritreans; and Egypt and Sudan deepen military Cooperation.

Hachalu Hundessa: Ethiopia’s ghost of the past, the present and the future

On June 29th prominent Oromo singer and activist Hachalu Hundessa was murdered by gunmen in the capital of Ethiopia. Hachalu Hundessa’s life, death and the events following his death are deeply tied to the path Ethiopia is taking as a nation. The remnants of the former dictatorial regime, ethnic tensions, in/out group politics, regional versus national power and the power and abuse of state actors delineate the character and struggle of politics in Africa’s second most populous country. When Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali was elected in 2018 he opened up the political system towards more inclusion for ethnic groups and regional authorities. Powerful political opponents counter these new narratives of inclusiveness with their own narratives of ethnic/regional autonomy and self-rule. The response of Abiy Ahmed’s government after Hachalu Hundessa’s death are illustrative of botched responses that undermine Ahmed’s path towards an inclusive government.