News Highlights: EP Resolution demands immediate release of Dawit Isaak, 15-year old boy dies on Italian ship, UNSC extends resolution for checking and seizing Libya boats

In this week’s news highlights: European Parliament demands the release of Eritrean-Swedish journalist Dawit Isaak and condemns ongoing human rights abuses; Migrants drown and go missing off the coast of Djibouti; Detention centres for Ethiopian migrants in Saudi Arabia remain “hellish”; 5 migrants jailed after riot in detention centre in Morocco; Security Council grants extension of resolution on inspection and seizure of migrant boats from Libya; Teenage boy who shows signs of torture dies on Italian quarantine ship; British Home Secretary introduces new laws on asylum that differentiate people using traffickers; Italy alleviates migration rules and Salvini goes on trial; Immigrant groups in Norway unprotected from pressure and control of governments from which they fled; Refugees on Lesbos in Greece continue to live in appalling sanitary conditions; and the DRC Report highlights the consequences of Covid-19 on the Global Compact of Refugees.

The EU and its “no more roads approach” in Eritrea

On June 15, the European Parliament Committee on Development (DEVE) held a hearing in the European Parliament (EP) on the European Union’s development cooperation with Eritrea and in particular the road rehabilitation project that is carried out with the help of national service labour, which is widely defined as forced labour. The hearing included a change of views between the European Commission’s Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development (DEVCO), the Europe External Action Service (EEAS) and members of the committee on progress and the possibilities on getting results on the very difficult situation in Eritrea. The ‘no more roads’ decision can be seen as the most important outcome.

EU Dublin Regulation assessment shows continued shortcomings

In February 2020, the most recent European Implementation Assessment titled “Dublin Regulation on international protection applications study” revealed many weaknesses in the current Dublin Regulation. The study, established by the European Parliamentary Research Services (EPRS) together with the research team of the European Council on Refugees and Exiles (ECRE), shows that the original aim of the Dublin Regulation is not being achieved. Moreover, it appears that the costs of its implementations are significant given that its objectives are not being met. The Dublin Regulation, among other things, determines which EU member state is responsible for the assessment of an asylum claim. The assessment of the Dublin Regulation accompanies the implementation report on the Dublin Regulation of November 2019 that was published by the European Parliament.